Tuesday, 28 May 2013

May Angling Report 2011

Sunday, 5 June 2011

May Angling Report 2011





Photo 01 - looking towards the outlet.
May Angling Report
PIKE
Not in keeping with years gone by May has turned out to be a successful month for hunters of Esox Lucius. Spawning now clearly passed, the business of feeding is back on the agenda with numerous anglers reporting multiple catches of Pike. The figures received from returns are as follows 15 – 20lbs 3 fish reported, 10 – 15lbs 16 fish reported, 5 – 10lbs 12 fish reported and under 5lbs 5 fish reported. The number of returns received again fall short of the number of angler days and this is something that will need to be improved!
BROWN TROUT
Some very good days have been reported along with some complete blanks which indicate that conditions are playing an important part in the feeding habits of the Trout. The most productive method by far is trolling with blade spinners and replicants. Fly fishing brought a few Trout to the net the biggest being 1.5lbs.
Numbers reported are 1 – 1.5lbs 5 Trout, and 0.5lbs to 1.00lbs 12 Trout. Only 13 angler days were recorded for the month with regard to Trout.
PERCH & EELS
12 Perch were reported with the biggest being 0.75lbs and 7 Eels with the biggest being one of 2.50lbs falling to our treasurer John Wright (see below).
INTER CLUB COMPETITION
Our team in this competition comprising of Lawson Simpson and Les Henderson battled through to the next round of the competition having caught 6 fish to Coldstream’s nil return. Coldstream could only field one angler which was a shame but that’s how it goes! Well done lads and good luck for the next round!
A HALCYON DAY!
A report received from our treasurer who fished overnight on Thursday which was a beautiful and balmy evening went as follows. After laying some of the Turf Protecta in the boathouse parking area fishing commenced and within 10 minutes a Pike of 4lbs was brought to the net, at the same time another take which resulted in a dropped run! To cut a long story short this type of action continued all through the night with six Pike landed, four dropped runs and an Eel of two and a half pounds! And if this was not enough at around 4.00am an Otter was spotted only yards away gently swimming up the side of the loch! Add in that the Osprey was also noted at close range and you have a fishing event indelibly etched in memory.
Yes “plastic” anglers know nothing of such pleasures; it is days such as this that give the real anglers the satisfaction of knowing that they are truly one with wild nature! Absolutely priceless!
A MAMMOTH UNDERTAKING COMPLETED
I ran into Ian Fernyhough yesterday who was cutting the grass around the war memorial. As you will know Ian & Barbara have just completed their planned cycle run, taking approximately three weeks to come from Lands End to John o Groats. Biggest complaint – the cold, unlike the unseasonal April we enjoyed May was cold windy and damp. Broken chains plagued them and to minimise the possibility of further breakages excess strain on the chain had to be minimised by occasionally dismounting and walking up steep hills. The high spots – good simple food, good company and some stunning scenery! The low spots – the weather! Well done to you both, most enjoyable following the trials and tribulations you endured! www.barbarianme.com
HABITAT IMPROVEMENTS
We are now about to embark on the improvements suggested by the Wild Trout Trust. Alasdair White our secretary will measure out a stretch of the Kirkstead burn to give us a rough figure of how many trees and defenders we will require and select a stretch of the burn where we may make an improvement and monitor the resilience of the construction over the winter.
TWEED TROUT & GRAYLING INITIATIVE
A meeting was held on Tuesday evening at the Tweed Commissions HQ at Drygrange. Kenny Galt the initiatives biologist confirmed that our burns will be electro fished in July. A netting survey may also be carried out. He also mentioned that he had constructed a non destructive gastric lavage/aspiration device to examine the food content contained in the stomachs of larger trout. Anglers on catching a large Trout should take a few scales for examination (it is very simple) and hand them to our loch keeper. See our Science page on the main website for methodology on taking scales.
It was interesting to note that the Wild Trout Trust was becoming involved in habitat restoration all over the catchment area, proof indeed that our actions of commissioning a survey last year was right and fitting! Would be nice to hear from the feral cretins that derided our efforts last year!
Photo 02 - The gigantic initial swarm.
Photo 03 - The swarm moves in to their new residence.
SURVIVAL INSTINCT
The photo above shows a huge swarm of bees that I captured and managed to hive. All pretty routine stuff for a keeper of bees. Next day however I went to see how they were doing and was quite surprised by what took place.
A large swarm of bees is usually the result of the reigning queen prompted by her subjects deciding to leave the hive taking a large number of bees with her; subsequent swarms are led by virgin queens taking only a small ball of bees with her. The photo below shows a large swarm of bees leaving the huge swarm of bees that I had hived the day before. I have never come across this phenomenon before.
Photo 04 - A swarm within a swarm!
I can only surmise that a virgin queen left with the original queen and having detected another queen in the hive chose not to fight to the death as is usual, but instead clear off with a large ball of bees to ensure survival of both colonies of bees! If a fight had taken place and both queens were fatally injured as sometimes happens then both colonies would be doomed as the resident bees would have no young eggs with which to rear an “emergency” queen. I will let them settle for a few days and then examine them to see that each hive has a queen before transporting them to Cappercleuch.
Tight Lines!

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