Thursday, 2 May 2013

Photo - a view from above Bowerhope.
Arctic Charr
I received an e mail on Friday from the Clerk to the Tweed Commission outlining the procedure for our application to reintroduce the species. Our pro forma application is already with them. The process will be introduction by special consent and once I have written out our case for reintroduction the proposal will be forwarded to the Tweed Committee, the management group of the Tweed Commission in November. The recommendations of the committee with regard to our proposal will go before the Tweed Commission in full for approval in December. The possible introduction of fry harvested from Talla reservoir will then take place in the spring of the year with assistance from Glasgow University.
As the species is endangered and of national importance approval from Scottish National Heritage will also be required, a full submission to them is in hand. It would be a huge coup for the club to be a small part of the process in which the future of this noble fish is secured and in our case returned to their natural home of St Mary's Loch. We will keep you posted.
New permit outlet
We are pleased to announce that J&A TURBULL of Bank Street Galashiels has agreed to become our outlet for permit sales in the town. This establishment will cater for all your angling needs and in addition to your tackle you will get advice from a man with a long and industrious background in angling circles. The proprietor Tom Hardy has long been a member of Gala AA and has held many senior offices in the club. He is also a River Tweed Commissioner as well as being a jolly decent bloke. We look forward to a mutually beneficial arrangement with Tom and have no hesitation in recommending the outlet for all your angling requirements.
Scotland v England
On Sunday we are host to a visit from Region 52 Ayrshire and Region 24 Northumberland of the Pike Anglers Club of Great Britain. This fish in will be viewed with the same fervour as a football match between the two nations! My forecast – it's too close to call!
Who I met today.
I was taking in some rays today as they say on the far side of the loch when a rambling angler stumbled upon me and we got down to a good old speak. A fellow angler from Durham called Paul and we got talking about a plethora of things and it turns out we are both advocates of the big K Kawasaki motorbikes. Not the ubiquitous plastic rockets but air cooled muscle of the 70s and 80s. Turns out he has a Z1, an 1100 Lawson rep, a KRIS 250 and the wife has a GPz550. And if that was not enough he is looking for another Z1 and a Z1000 mk2. And on the fishing front on his last visit to the lochs he caught a 3.5lbs Brown Trout from the Lowes which he said accelerated faster than any of the ironmongery previously mentioned. Respect mate on all fronts!
Yet another visitor to the lochs respectful of the property of others, deploring of Muppet types and not the slightest interest in angling for plastic engineered fish, the quarry of the terminally challenged!
Golden Cappercleuch Honey!
Peter's hives have been most industrious and produced a good crop of what is a surprisingly light and delicate honey to die for. Peter in the photo displays a comb of the first Cappercleuch honey for many years, the verdict, absolutely delicious! Another hive will be heading up to Bowerhope at the end of the month where resident Derek and son Sam are to learn the art.
Photo - Peter with a fine comb of Cappercleuch honey.
Thugs or valiant defenders?
At this time of year wasps become a real pest as intense hunger has them persistently buzzing people once a sweet aroma is detected. But have a look at the photo below; they even try to enter beehives lured by the sweet smell of honey. At first glance it would seem that they have free reign to enter at will as the worker field bees
Thugs or valiant defenders?
At this time of year wasps become a real pest as intense hunger has them persistently buzzing people once a sweet aroma is detected. But have a look at the photo below; they even try to enter beehives lured by the sweet smell of honey. At first glance it would seem that they have free reign to enter at will as the worker field bees entering and exiting the hive largely ignore them.
However all is not what it seems, inside around the hive entrance are stationed guard bees who immediately engage intruders (including me) and the wasps fate is sealed from that moment on. The wasp is tackled by a group of guards stung to death, and without further ado dragged out of the hive and dumped to await the arrival of undertaker bees who will dispose of the corpses away from the hive. Bumble bees also come to the hives seeking honey, the only difference with them being due to their sheer size they are able to drag the guard bees outside the hive in an effort to escape but there can only be one outcome for the unfortunate Bumble bee and that is death! The ruthless side of nature methinks!
Photo - Executed wasps await removal by undertaker bees.

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