Sunday, 23 July 2017

A brother of the angle!




Photo 01 - Mike's rib protector which we hope to employ!

A brother of the angle!

Unlike most other angling clubs in the Borders we have a sizable fleet of boats to aid our anglers as well as a (poorly) paid employee but we shall not concern ourselves with that for the moment. The boats are a real boon to our anglers allowing them to access areas which are unreachable from the bank.  They are also a means for groups of anglers to fish together and not get in the way of other boat occupants.

Unfortunately the boats bring with them tasks requiring money and man hours to maintain them in safe working order. Apart from Muppet damage as reported last week the majority of maintenance required is with regard to the metal (steel or stainless steel) runners that protect the bottom of the boat from damage by underwater rocks.

These runners are secured to the bottom of the boats by screws usually stainless steel but due to the heavy impact trauma of a lateral nature these can be ripped out over time.  If one is ripped out and the runner comes away from the fibreglass bottom and not noticed then it is usually only a short time until the complete runner is ripped out.

When this occurs a laborious process of drying the now enlarged holes, drilling out loose fibreglass and forming a cavity in the shape of a pear with a mini grinder is required. This shape is then filled with chopped strand fibre glass which when set will provide a medium that can be drilled and screwed and because of the shape it cannot be pulled out.

All of our boats have many such repairs to the bottom and its a good repair but  very time consuming. So when good friend and club member Mike Christie wrote to us recently with a new idea for keel and rim protection we were all ears. The system he is employing on their boat on Talla consists of using heavy duty water pipe which is a thick and durable pipe as it has to be for transporting mains water.

Photo 02 - Both ribs protected!

A slot is cut along the length of the pipe slightly smaller than the rim of the boat and this is then force fitted on to the rim and the rigidity of the pipe means that no additional fixing is required. This protection would have prevented the damage to our Lomond last week!

Another great idea of Mikes is to slip a complete length over the keel runner dispensing with the need to apply metal runners. However due to the bashing this structure takes it is likely that we would have to use mechanical fixings at each end and the middle. We are currently swaying towards a stainless steel bolt through the pipe probably with moulded flats created by a heat gun bolting through the fibre glass keel.

Mike is getting us some pipe so we can experiment but like him I really think this could be the most durable method of affording protection to our Lomond boats! The brotherhood of angling in action, one angler helping another, Mike is just one of the many anglers we encounter fit to be called a brother of the angle! Thanks Mike!

Casualties!

We received reports yesterday of a mid sized double Pike having been washed up on the shingle bank at the sculptures on the far side of the loch. The Pike was reported as having two wire traces lodged in its gullet which is a bit of a disappointment. It is in our interests to covet any indigenous fish resident in the loch as they are quite simply our future sport!

The club has issued guidance on the minimum tackle specifications which should be employed and I will recap these for information.  Firstly use a rod with a suitable test curve so that you can direct the fish to the area you want we suggest a minimum of 3lbs test curve.

If using monofilament you should use a minimum of 20lbs breaking strain. Pound for pound monofilament line has much more abrasion resistance than equivalent braided line. I myself use Yo-zurri fluorocarbon co polymer line which is a mix of monofilament and fluorocarbon with a fluorocarbon sheath giving it exceptional abrasion resistance with the added bonus of extra strength. Twenty pounds line typically breaks at around 27lbs pressure.

Braided line is very popular due to its reluctance to stretch giving the angler feedback on all that the fish is doing on the end of the line. The ability of braid however to withstand abrasion is poor which has led to Pike advisory groups stating that to achieve similar resistance of abrasion to 20lb monofilament breaking strains of 50 – 60lbs should be used!


Twenty pounds BS braid is no use at all. I have not seen the braid attached to the two traces but I would suspect it is less than the figures given above. The bottom of St Mary’s is littered with ragged sharp slate like stoned which abrade line quickly. 

Always try and apply upwards pressure on your fish to lever it away from the bottom and please do not go lower than the breaking strains mentioned above. Pike fishing by its very nature will lead to the odd casualty, it is incumbent on us however to do all we can to minimise this! Our Pike are our future!

From our recommended dealer!

This week Mike has some great clearance offers and when they are gone they're gone! Greys rods and reels at huge discounts the kind you really do want in your tackle bag. There is also a large selection of reservoir and river flies to top up your box. Click the link to see the offers - http://www.fishersdirect.com/fario-premium-flies-361-c.asphttp://www.fishersdirect.com/fario-premium-flies-361-c.asp 

http://www.fishersdirect.com/greys-gx300-fly-reel-581-p.asp 

http://www.fishersdirect.com/greys-gr30-fly-rod-6123-p.asp

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